About

The Team

Light Collective

Light Collective consists of Sharon Stammers and Martin Lupton who have both been involved in the lighting industry for over 20 years. Based in the UK and essentially architectural lighting designers, their portfolio of work has diversified in many different directions – light activism being one of them.

 

Sharon Stammers

“Having been involved in lighting design from the very beginning, women have had a greater role in shaping the lighting design profession than in architecture and engineering. The lighting design profession is a supportive industry for women and the many routes into the profession offer opportunities from a diverse set of backgrounds. It is an industry that is good at sharing information amongst its community and can therefore offer support to other women who may need it. We want to encourage women to choose to work in lighting or other related jobs.”

Sharon Stammers, Light Collective
Martin Lupton

“We started this project to try and make a difference. Although women make up at least 50% of the lighting design profession, you only have to look at the number of women speaking at major conferences, acting as judges in awards, being asked as keynotes and serving on editorial boards to realise that the profile of women is significantly lower than men. We want to change this.”

Martin Lupton, Light Collective
Forma Family

formalighting

The project launch is being supported by formalighting, a family owned Italian lighting designer and manufacturer with over 50 years and 2 generations dedicated to architectural lighting. Light Collective approached formalighting with this project as they are a company with a strong inspirational woman in a lead role – Sharon Maghnagi, based in their Hong Kong headquarters.

Katia Kolovea

Katia Kolovea

Katia Kolovea is a young passionate lighting designer. After the completion of her studies in Greece, Spain and Sweden, she moved to London where she is working as a lighting designer at Urban Electric. Her excitement about light and people led her to create her personal online project archifos. She loves public speaking, sharing ideas and collaborating in exciting projects and events to raise awareness for the lighting design profession.

Interesting Reads

A History of WILD Women: Video of presentation at LEDucation 2019 by Women in Lighting + Design // YouTube // 8 Mar 2019

Leading ladies of lighting design // lightform // Last accessed 8 Mar 2019

Pioneering Women of American Architecture: A collection of profiles of 50 women born before 1940 who have made important contributions to American architecture. // Last accessed 8 Mar 2019

Un Cafe con Lara: In each issue, Lara Elbaz chat with a woman Lighting Designer, to talk about her interests, concerns, hopes and motivations. In Spanish. // Last accessed 8 Mar 2019

WiBSE – Women in Building Services Engineering: The WiBSE network aims to support and encourage women joining, working, staying and progressing in the building services industry. // Last accessed 8 Mar 2019

Why Mothers Leave Design (and How to Keep Them) by Emily Klingensmith, Schuler Shook, & Lisa J Reed, Envision Lighting Design // Last accessed 8 Mar 2019

Snubbed, cheated, erased: the scandal of architecture’s invisible women by Oliver Wainwright // The Guardian // 16 Oct 2018

IET Smashing Stereotypes to Bits Campaign: Institution of Engineering and Technology launch new campaign designed to smash stereotypes associated with careers in STEM // YouTube // 21 Jun 2018

International Women’s Day 2018: Interview with Helen Diemer, President of The Lighting Practice  // 8 Mar 2018

A Conversation About Women in Lighting & Design by Lois I. Hutchinson // WestCoast Lighting Insider // 18 Jan 2018

Hidden Figures… Shadowed Illuminators? by Lisa J. Reed // Illuminating Engineering Society // 22 Aug 2017

Lack of diversity within UK's creative industries revealed by Ali Morris // Dezeen // 7 Aug 2017

Profile: Paule Constable // arc Magazine // 18 Feb 2016

Women in Lighting Design: Elizabeth Donoff examines the role of women past, present, and future // Architectural Lighting Magazine // 13 May 2008